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"What's up?" feature

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"What's up?" feature
« on: September 05, 2017, 03:51:49 pm »
Just discovered the "what's up?" feature (this appears to have been around for a while but I just saw it promoted in the Alexa app). If you say "Alexa, what's up?" you get the current time, the weather forecast, your next few calendar events (if you have any calendars linked), and a news story. In some situations I think I'll actually find this more useful than the Flash Briefing.

Re: "What's up?" feature
« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2017, 06:07:43 pm »
To Brits, or Brits of a certain age, or just Brits from Yorkshire possibly, 'What's up?' means 'What's the matter?' or 'What's gone wrong?' so we'd kind of expect Alexa to tell us bravely through muffled sobs that it was nothing, nothing at all, and she'd be alright in a minute. Of course, our UK Alexa might ...

Re: "What's up?" feature
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2017, 05:18:48 am »
To Brits, or Brits of a certain age, or just Brits from Yorkshire possibly, 'What's up?' means 'What's the matter?' or 'What's gone wrong?' so we'd kind of expect Alexa to tell us bravely through muffled sobs that it was nothing, nothing at all, and she'd be alright in a minute. Of course, our UK Alexa might ...

I watched an Emily Blunt interview. she said when Brits say quite good. It means  it's bad?


she's a US citizen now though. I really am obsessed with your accent by the way and my goal really is to die in your country for some reason.

Re: "What's up?" feature
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2017, 10:41:11 am »
To Brits, or Brits of a certain age, or just Brits from Yorkshire possibly, 'What's up?' means 'What's the matter?' or 'What's gone wrong?' so we'd kind of expect Alexa to tell us bravely through muffled sobs that it was nothing, nothing at all, and she'd be alright in a minute. Of course, our UK Alexa might ...

I watched an Emily Blunt interview. she said when Brits say quite good. It means  it's bad?


she's a US citizen now though. I really am obsessed with your accent by the way and my goal really is to die in your country for some reason.

Haha, yes - we have quite a lot of those! 'No problem' means 'You've seriously inconvenienced me', 'Drop in any time' means 'Don't even ring the doorbell without an appointment', and 'That was really very nice' means 'Never. Eating. Here. Again'! If you want to die in the UK, try being a comedian for sober people who fancy themselves as intellectuals :)